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It’s often said that the last person to enter the House of Parliament with honest intentions was Guy Faulkes.
“Rememver remember the Fifth of November
Gunpowder treason and plot”

So here we are. Tonight is Halloween, Saturday is Guy Faulkes Night, and, I understand, this week , this year, I understand, it also happens to be Diwali. All this adds up to a fabulous week of fun and celebration. A jolly good time will be had by all!

Well no actually .

There at least two groups of people , and I belong to both, who dread this time of year.

They are?
Horse owners, and dog owners, and more specifically, Guide Dog Owners.

The reason?

Fireworks!

Now, OK, I grant you, fireworks aren’t traditionally integral to Halloween, but for some people it’s any excuse to party with a bang. Also, while fireworks are a big part of Diwali, it is a festival of light after all, Diwali itself is a moveable celebration, so happens at a slightly different time each year. However, most people would agree that the celebration of Guys Faulkes takes place on far more days than just the 5th November..

There are supposed to be regulations controlling when, and to whom, fireworks can be sold, as wel as when, where, and by whom, they can can be letoff
Yeh right!

I don’t know of many Guide Dog Owners who don’t actually dread this time of year. I expect it’s the same for other Assistance Dog Owners too. A frightened, anxious dog can’t work safely. So what do you do? Do you reach for the white stick and leave Fido at home? OK if you aren’t going to be very long, or there’s someone at home to look after the dog; and if you’re a confident cane user. Do you stay at home and live like a recluse for the duration? Hardly practical, or possible, especially if you have to get to work or take the kids to school.do you carry on as normal and prey/hope/trust that nothing bad will happen?

Guide Dogs often have to hang up their harness for good as a direct result of being terrified by fireworks.

For horse owners it’s just as difficult.. Even if you know that there is going to be an organised display or private party close to where you keep your horse, you have very few options. Very few, if any, of us, are able to take our horses elsewhere for the duration. Even if we could, there’s no guarantee that there won’t be fireworks there too! So, do you leave your horses out, or shut them in? There’s no right or wrong answer here. Horses, being prey animals instinctively flee , or bolt, from scarey, things. Their mantra is, ‘Run first, ask questions later – Your life might depend on it!’. A terrified horse is dangerous, both to themself and anyone who gets in their any. They are runnin on pure Adrenalin and they are not engaging their mind.

Every year horses die as a direct result of fireworks. I’ve already read about one this weekend. Usually horses have to be put to sleep, or even sometimes shot, because of injuries they sustained while trying to run away. Often , prolonged exposure to adrenalin from the fear, stress and anxiety that prolonged or repeated fireworks cause, leads to a lethal bout of colic. Some horses just drop dead because their heart just can’t take it anymore. Whatever, the result is the same, a dead horse, and a decastated owner. All because of fireworks.is it worth it? If it was up to me fireworks would only be allowed at organised public displays, and those Chinese Lanterns that float off indescriminately with a lit flame inside them would be banned outright. It’s not up to me though.

So please, if you are planning a fireworks party this year, let people know. Then, they can at least try to make it easier for their animals.