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Anybody who knows me will tell you that I am pathologically incapable of being tidy. A place for everything, well yes, this I can do, but, everything in it’s place – yeh right! Don’t get me wrong, it’s not intentional. I am always impressed, and to be honest, reassured, by a tidy, well organised house, office, yard, tack room, etc. I just can’t do it myself . I’d like to, I just don’t have that kind of mind.. the problem is that, whilst I fully intend to, for example, take the empty joint Aid pot up to the house to be recycled, or slip the dressage test sheet back into the folder, something always distracts me before I do, the item I am supposed to be dealing with will be put to one side, my intention being to come back later and finish the job – but then…

Hang on a minute! I hear you all shout. Aren’t all blind people inherentally tidy and well organised? Don’t all blind people have a built in ability to remember where everything is with millimetre precision? Erm, no actually. I wish we did, after all, I’ve blogged before about the amount of time I’ve wasted over the years frantically searching for stuff that’s directly under my nose. . Sadly though, it’s just a myth born of over sentimental fictional representation of blindness. Yes, there are indeed some blind folk out there who are obsessively tidy and well organised, and genuinely know exactly where everything is, but this is due to their personality, not their blindness, and I am definitely not one of them.

There are two areas of my life where, despite appearances, I really do make a supreme effort to try to be tidy and organised. My work, and my yard. I am highly conscious that, , in both these environments, my disorganised muddle could potentially impact on the wellbeing of others. Not only that, vut,i worry about being judged as incapable or incompetent.. just as I want my clients to feel that they are in a safe pair of hands, so I want any professionals who visit the yard to feel that my horses are. Oh my word it’s a struggle though! Where work is concerned, the focus of my attempts to be tidy is my stock cupboard. When it comes to the horses, it’s the Tack Room.

Ah,my tack room, so much more than a place to store saddles and bridles. . It is the hub of the yard, a place to make plans, a place to dream about the future and recount adventures from the past. The Tack Room provides a haven from the extremes of the Devon weather, and a space to drink tea and chew the fat. Many a tear has been shed there , and many a joke shared and prank pulled. Oh yeh, I also keep all manner of tack , rugs, and equipment in there, as well as using it as my feed room.

from brand new additions like Florence’s Gallop Equestrian ride on fly rug and Ellico memory foam girth, both of which I love, and will be making it to the Poo Picking Recommends page, to old favourites such as the wooden storage box that was made by my Dad’s colleague Bill vack in 1988 that actually used to stand in Oliver Twist’s stable because there was no storage on the yard. , it’s all there.

The only problem with my Tack Room is that, because it is actually a wooden stable, it gets damp, so I don’t always keep the saddles and bridles in there all the time. Most of the time they live in the house. Effectively I have two Tack Rooms! Our Utility Room douvles up as an auxiliary Tack Room. There are saddle racks and bridle hooks, and two enormous shelves, built by Hal, which hold all my spare rugs.it’s where I clean my tack, and it’s where it lives in damp weather. The trouble is that this means having to carry the saddles between house and yard, something that I find challenging to say the least.

. I haven’t actually dropped a saddle yet, but I dread doing so. I often wonder if getting some kind of tack trolly would. Something I could push, or even better, pull along , that I could sit the saddles on would make life easier for me and the saddles alike.

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In the meantime though I need to clean my tack. Now, where did I put the…?

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